Wishing it were all real...

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Reepicheep
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Post by Reepicheep » Mon Dec 29, 2003 8:22 pm

ARrrrrghgghhhghhh!!!
Stupid stupid stupid.
I finished Portrait of a Lady today and I hated it..I only started getting into it by page 500 and even then I was just hoping for a good ending..it didn't have ANY sort of ending..it was torture the whole time...with no reward at the end :cry:
Soooo..I guess it's time for the Silmarillion..
Buster:"Sister is my new mother, Mother..."

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theHermit
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Post by theHermit » Thu Aug 04, 2005 5:19 pm

They Mayor is indeed wise. On Fairy Stories is a must read on a number of levels. And magic is out there, but can be difficult to see depending on the context. I share Flo's desire to make as much of it real as possible.

When I first read the Hobbit at age 11 I wanted so badly for Hobbiton and Middle Earth to be real because I wanted to live there. As I've gotten older I have tried to make as much of the magic real as possible with the choices I've made in life. What I envision now is Hobbiton with a little technology and medical science added in (I'm rather attached to my iBook and DVD technology!) but nothing that would spoil the natural world that hobbits and elves value so. The world as a whole could benefit greatly by studying the moral values Tolkien imparts in his books. In grad school I specialized in 19th century American lit, notably Thoreau and for him Nature is moral and I think the same is largely true of Tolkien and Lewis's world view.

I appreciate the convienence of cars but loathe the offspring of the internal combustion engine and much of the industrial revolution which has accounted for so much of what we consider to be progress. Much of it is good, but what is key is to remember balance. Many today are detached from the sources required to bring food to our tables and energy to power the light (to name one example) in our homes. It's very instructive to spend a day working on a farm, at the source, to appreciate anew the fruits of life and our labor. Hobbits share a love of things that grow, to quote the narrator in FoTR, and so should we all!

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Re: Wishing it were all real...

Post by Losfer Words » Sat May 13, 2006 3:39 pm

Reepicheep wrote:I hate it that I can't actually find a land where hobbit holes exist.
Okay after I get through yelling in my Linus "what do you mean there is no Great Pumpkin" voice "WHAT DO YOU MEAN IT"S NOT REAL! followed by the classic Charlie Brown arrrrggghhhh!

I will send you a copy of the map that shows how to sail the straight road into the West to lands of the Valar.

You have to realize that thing like the Encylopedia of Things That Never Were (good book) is merely a source of disinformation. Long ago Morgoth and Sauron ordered their minions to hide in the deep place of the Earth and wait for their return. So the disinformation campaign was launched by Gandalf and his assistant editors Bilbo and Frodo to keep such foul things as lingering orcs and Balrogs from ever finding their way West again.

And your present stature is but a mere illusion placed upon you by the Valar to mask your presence in the mortal world. Just as Gandalf and the other Istari Wizards were able to mask their true appearance. And on that note if anyone knows where the two blue wizards are tell them the ring went back into the fire 7,000 years ago and report back to Valinor at once.

Non-tolkien book suggestions to add to that library.
The Calvin Miller trilogies.
The Singer, The Song, The Finale
and
The Symphony Trilogy: A Requiem for Love, An Overture of Light, and A Symphony In The Sand
On a crystal morning I can see the dewdrops falling
Down from a gleaming heaven, I can hear the voices calling
When you comin' home now, son, this world is not for you

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MayorOfLongview
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Post by MayorOfLongview » Sat May 13, 2006 5:35 pm

Non-tolkien book suggestions to add to that library.
The Calvin Miller trilogies.
The Singer, The Song, The Finale
and
The Symphony Trilogy: A Requiem for Love, An Overture of Light, and A Symphony In The Sand


I've actually met and had breakfast with Calvin Miller. And FYI, the Singer Trilogy was Jon Anderson's inspiration for Awaken (Going For The One).

Steve
I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down.'- Bob Newhart

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Post by Losfer Words » Sat May 13, 2006 6:47 pm

MayorOfLongview wrote: And FYI, the Singer Trilogy was Jon Anderson's inspiration for Awaken (Going For The One).
I learned something new today :)
On a crystal morning I can see the dewdrops falling
Down from a gleaming heaven, I can hear the voices calling
When you comin' home now, son, this world is not for you

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Sam Gamgee
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Post by Sam Gamgee » Thu Mar 08, 2007 8:41 pm

"We do not, or need not, despair of drawing because all lines must be either curved or straight, nor of painting because there are only three “primary” colours. We may indeed be older now, in so far as we are heirs in enjoyment or in practice of many generations of ancestors in the arts. In this inheritance of wealth there may be a danger of boredom or of anxiety to be original, and that may lead to a distaste for fine drawing, delicate pattern, and “pretty” colours, or else to mere manipulations and over-elaboration of old material, clever and heartless. But the true road of escape from such weariness is not to be found in the willfully awkward, clumsy, or misshapen, not in making all things dark or unremittingly violent; nor in the mixing of colours on through subtlety to drabness, and the fantastical complication of shapes to the point of silliness and on towards delirium. Before we reach such states we need recovery. We should look at green again, and be startled anew (but not blinded) by blue and yellow and red. We should meet the centaur and the dragon, and the perhaps suddenly behold, like the ancient shepherds, sheep, and dogs, and horses—and wolves. This recovery fairy-stories help us to make in that sense only a taste for them my make us, or keep us, childish.”
-Tolkien, Tree and Leaf

“I do not accept the tone of scorn or pity with which ‘Escape’ is now so often used… Why should a man be scorned if, finding himself in prison, he tries to get out and go home? Or if, when he cannot do so, he thinks and talks about other topics than jailers and prison-walls? The world outside has not become less real because the prisoner cannot see it.”
-Tolkien, Tree and Leaf


WELL said, JRR.
[color=#ff6600][i]Workings of man crying out from the fires set aflame
By his blindness to see that the warmth of his being
Is promised for his seeing, his reaching so clearly[/i][/color]

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