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Joe-×
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Re: Eragon

Post by Joe-× » Wed Dec 06, 2006 9:05 pm

Joe-× wrote:I couldn't find the book in either of the kids' rooms
But I did find the first two books of the Bartimaeus trilogy. It's basically a Harry Potter young wizard kind of thing, but it's chock full of twisted humour. Bartimaeus is a 5000 year old djinni who talks to the reader in comical asides located in footnotes. Great pacing and a decent enough story that seems somewhat original. I'm always looking for the ethical allegories in books like this, and this one seems to be lacking one. Maybe, something will crop up in the last book. The third book comes out on paperback on January 1st, so I'll have to cycle thru the Lord of the Rings (and maybe the corresponding history books while I'm at it) while I wait.

Also slowly working my way thru the complete Chesterton Volume 1 & 2 during my week adoration time at church. Finished volume 2 - Francis, Aquinas, and Everlasting Man. All excellent. Probably wrapping up Heretics this weekend. Asked wifey to get me Volume 3 to keep me going next year. The man's wit is razor sharp.

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Sam Gamgee
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Post by Sam Gamgee » Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:26 am

I *love* his book on Aquinas. This may have to do with the fact that I'm the man's most excited groupie (meaning Aquinas, not Chesterton, although I do have a lot of respect for him as well)... but still. Hearts, all around. Feel the Thomist love.
[color=#ff6600][i]Workings of man crying out from the fires set aflame
By his blindness to see that the warmth of his being
Is promised for his seeing, his reaching so clearly[/i][/color]

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Post by Sam Gamgee » Sun Dec 17, 2006 2:44 pm

Man. I found the craziest book at Barnes & Noble - I was browsing through the philosophy section, and I found this book called Introducing Heidegger. Since I seriously doubt I would get any meaning out of suffering through 500 pages of Heidegger's famous Being and Time on my own (ROFL), but since I hear he's really important to modern theology, I wanted to know what he talks about... So I started flipping through it, and it's like... a 200-page picture book, only with weird black and white 70's or 80's looking illustrations every page. Which illustrate things like a couple of sketchy drawing of guys in suits with little superimposed captions to give various quotes or summaries of Heidegger's thought process, or werid abstract pictures trying to help with the difference between a "being-in-the-world" and a "being-with-others", or a copy-and-paste little picture of Jean-Paul Sartre holding a cigarette whenever describing Heidegger's influence on other philosophers... The funny thing is, even though it seems on the one hand juvenille and ridiculously idiotic, and you just feel so condescended upon by the fact that they're telling you in picture book form... it's acutally a pretty good philosophical explanation, I'm almost ashamed to admit. Like as in, it's not too dumbed-down, but it actually makes some sense of what this complicated guy is talking about. I think I finally understand what a dasein is. Or at least, I would, except I forgot. I'll have to go read it again.

OK. Now I need your help. I'm such a nerd I'm sitting at home reading only theology and philosophy with all my free time, but I have this craving for good fiction. Only I'm afraid to even try anything because there's so much junk out there that's not worth anyone's time. Any recommendations on good fantasy (or non-fantasy) that has some creativity and depth? (as opposed to those kind of dull, unoriginal out Forgotten Realms style books they keep churning out...)
[color=#ff6600][i]Workings of man crying out from the fires set aflame
By his blindness to see that the warmth of his being
Is promised for his seeing, his reaching so clearly[/i][/color]

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Post by bb » Tue Dec 19, 2006 10:29 am

Maybe the Song of Fire and Ice series by George R.R. Martin? The story flow isn't exactly what you would call focused, but it sure is evocative. So far he has 4 written: A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, and A Feast for Crows. Haven't read that last one yet.

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Post by theHermit » Tue Dec 19, 2006 7:14 pm

I can second the recommendation for George RR Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series. Very well written and extremely gripping.

I would also recommend anything by Neil Gaiman or Ursula K. Le Guin. Her last two novels, Gifts and Voices, are outstanding. Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials is also exceptional, being both original and complex.
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Post by yeshead 777 » Wed Dec 20, 2006 5:57 am

Eragon!-I really like the story and character devolpment so far that was obviously left out of the movie for time restraints. Personally, I would have enjoyed a much longer movie that didn't leave alot of these details out, but then it probably wouldn't have been rated PG or geared towards the male teen audience as much. So far -I really like both the book and the movie, which is rare for me. I'm sure I'll want to read the second book immediately after this one. Has anyone read it? and is it a trilogy, or will there be more?
Art can "make people feel what's true rather than telling them".[Dan Haseltine,Jars of Clay].

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Post by Alatar » Wed Dec 20, 2006 7:59 am

Hi Sam, believe it or not Inttroducing Heidegger is part of a series. The Introducing ... series is a copy of a series called ... for Beginners. I have Postmodernism for Beginners and Hegel for Beginners, all done in the same cartoon style. They are good reading for somebody who is at undergraduate level, but has little familiarity with the subject matter. The weakest I am aware of in the series is Mao for Beginners which gives a lopsided view by glossing over some of his failures.
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Post by theHermit » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:17 pm

I have been reading Jim Butcher's Storm Front, which is book one of the Dresden Files. Fun stuff, as is the television series on Sci Fi.
"Lord, make me an instrument of Thy peace;
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;"
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Post by Thimon » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:59 pm

I am reading trough Robin Hobb's novels.
I completed The Farseer Trilogy and am now reading The Mad Ship of The Liveship Traders Trilogy. ( mouth full :lol: )

I just read that Terry Goodkind's The Sword of Truth series is coming to its end. Confessor should be released in Fall '07. Which is the 11th and the last in the series.
Never read any of his work... I might start when he's finished. :wink:

I got a thing with incomplete series... I don't read them in fear they will never finish or could be end. :roll: Silly me!
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Post by theHermit » Wed Feb 21, 2007 2:19 pm

Hobb's Farseer Trilogy is very good, as is the Liveship Traders.
"Lord, make me an instrument of Thy peace;
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;"
- from the Prayer of St. Francis

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Post by Bnielsen » Wed Feb 21, 2007 9:59 pm

I just finished 'Chapterhouse Dune', thus ending the 6th and final Dune series book.

Hmm... his writing confounds me! He puts soo much detail into setting up these wicked cool climaxes, and then devotes all of a paragraph to the main events themselves >.<

so much great backstory gets lost between each book as well
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Post by johnc » Sun Feb 25, 2007 12:10 am

Currently punching my way through "Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase For [Abraham] Lincoln's Killer". People give me books for Christmas presents, but I'd rather go to the library.
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Post by theHermit » Sun Mar 18, 2007 3:29 pm

nr Calvin Miller's The Singer. The Mayor mentioned that it was an inspiration for Jon Anderson/Awaken and so how could I not read this since Awaken is one of my favorite pieces of music.
"Lord, make me an instrument of Thy peace;
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;"
- from the Prayer of St. Francis

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Post by esteban » Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:48 pm

That's a bit surprising about The Singer. My aunt recommended that to me years ago but I've never picked it up. Need to do that.

Last books I read (parts of) were Neal Stephenson's Quicksilver and Gary Wills' What Jesus Meant. Wills' book is uniformly interesting and though-provoking even though he goes off once or twice in unwarranted directions. I made it through a third of Stephenson's opus before university called again. Sadly I chose a profession which allows me time to read (for pleasure that is) only during the summers. Which is only fair, since I make sure it's true of my students as well. :wink:
Ecce quam bonum et quam iucundum habitare fratres in unum.

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Post by theHermit » Wed Apr 11, 2007 1:23 pm

nr, Ysabel - Guy Gavriel Kay, author of another favorite trilogy: The Fionavar Tapestry and Tigana.
"Lord, make me an instrument of Thy peace;
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;"
- from the Prayer of St. Francis

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